XMM Newton, also referred to as the High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy Mission or the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission, is an X-ray Observatory launched on December 10, 1999 from the Guiana Space Centre in French Guiana, France on an Ariane 5 rocket. The mission is operated by the European Space Agency. Named after Sir Isaac Newton, XMM Newton’s mission involves the detection and investigation of x ray sources emerging from interstellar space, performing imaging of objects in X-ray, visibile and ultra violet wavelengths. The spacecraft comes equipped with three high throughput X-ray telescopes along with an optical monitor, the first of its kind on an X-ray observatory.  These tools allow XMM- Newton an unprecedented view capable of conducting highly sensitive observations of distant objects. Only Space telescopes have the ability to detect x-ray sources, as the Earth’s atmosphere effectively absorbs them. 
XMM Newton’s findings aid researchers in unraveling some of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos, particularly the enigmatic behavior of black holes and the very origins of the universe. To date, researchers have published approximately 5,600 papers documenting XMM-Newton and its scientific finding.

XMM Newton, also referred to as the High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy Mission or the X-ray 

Credit: ESA/XMM-Newton

Abell 30, “Born Again” Planetary Nebula.

 Credit: ESA/XMM-Newton and NSF/NOAO/KPNO